KMU Focus

Myeongwon Folk Museum, Tradition In KMU

  • 19.11.11 / 김해선

The Myeongwon Folk Museum is a hanok (traditional Korean house) building located across the street from the Bukak Campus’ back gate, making it part of Kookmin University's (KMU) second campus. The building has been designated as Seoul's Folklore material No. 7 in recognition of its value in the city. The original site was a different place, but the building, which was in danger of disappearing because of urban development, was donated to KMU by the original owner and moved to the gate’s rear in 1980. Its name, “Myeongwon,” is derived from the donor’s family name, Kim Mi-hee.
  
 Myeongwon Folk Museum was a typical Joseon era (1392-1910) upper-class mansion. It is located in the south and consists of the gate to the east, Sarangchae, Anchae, Byeolchae, Sadang,and Jeongja. It used to be bigger, but as the site was moved, only the current shape was left over. Looking at each structure, Sarangchae is a place where men usually live and entertain guests outside, while Anchae is a main building used by women, located far north of the gate. It is a colorful space that used to be used for family affairs because of the large area of rooms and yards, and is now the stage for classes and various events. Byeolchae is located behind the main building and is being used as a place for “MyeongUnDaehoe,” a student club for tea ceremony experience. Sadang is a ceremonial space for ancestral worship. Jeongja is a newly built space since it was moved to KMU, which is called Nok Yak Jeong that named Myungwon's tea room. Chodang is used as a space for traditional tea culture and relaxation. For reference, Sarangchae and Byeolchae are also used for various seminars and studies, which is good for groups meeting in schools. If you want to rent a place, you must fill out an application form in advance and book it before you can borrow it on time.

 
 Programs at the Myungwon Folk Museum can be divided into three main categories. First, “Darye” provides regular liberal arts class at Kookmin University, teaching about tea (korean, englsih lecture are present). Second, there is an irregular music program, and third, a Korean cultural experience can be processed by request. Prof. Yoo Yang-suk teaches “Darye” and “Korean Tea Ceremony and World Tea Culture,” which are the basic lessons of life in many countries, for practical use. Through the tea culture experience and tea practice, we aim to acquire living manners, compare the characteristics of various kinds of tea, understand the characteristicsof world tea culture and make them available in real life, while also understanding our tea culture and the sentiment of tea to find the leisure of life, beauty, and wisdom of life.In addition to the class, the “<Pungryu Division> Master Series” organized by KMU host masters from various fields such as Ajeng, Gayageum, Daegeum, Pansori, folk songs, and Firi, all of who show off their their specialties. Additionally, regular spring and fall music programs — such as jazz and fusion music — are held every year. 
 

 Lastly, in the case of Korean cultural experiences, the hanok, hanbok (traditional Korean dress), jesa (ritual law), and darye (tea ceremony experience) will be divided into four different types. Availability is flexible when at least five students apply as a group. Since the program is hosted by a real expert, real expenses are incurred and costs can be adjusted to some extent depending on students’ financial circumstances. All of these programs have the same hours of operations as KMU facilities, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays, and are closed on weekends and holidays. Even if you don't have an extra reservation, you can freely visit the area during operating hours, so if you have time between classes, feel free to taste the arts by the back door.

Chan-Yeong Kim Reporter
niet89@kookmin.ac.kr

Myeongwon Folk Museum, Tradition In KMU

The Myeongwon Folk Museum is a hanok (traditional Korean house) building located across the street from the Bukak Campus’ back gate, making it part of Kookmin University's (KMU) second campus. The building has been designated as Seoul's Folklore material No. 7 in recognition of its value in the city. The original site was a different place, but the building, which was in danger of disappearing because of urban development, was donated to KMU by the original owner and moved to the gate’s rear in 1980. Its name, “Myeongwon,” is derived from the donor’s family name, Kim Mi-hee.
  
 Myeongwon Folk Museum was a typical Joseon era (1392-1910) upper-class mansion. It is located in the south and consists of the gate to the east, Sarangchae, Anchae, Byeolchae, Sadang,and Jeongja. It used to be bigger, but as the site was moved, only the current shape was left over. Looking at each structure, Sarangchae is a place where men usually live and entertain guests outside, while Anchae is a main building used by women, located far north of the gate. It is a colorful space that used to be used for family affairs because of the large area of rooms and yards, and is now the stage for classes and various events. Byeolchae is located behind the main building and is being used as a place for “MyeongUnDaehoe,” a student club for tea ceremony experience. Sadang is a ceremonial space for ancestral worship. Jeongja is a newly built space since it was moved to KMU, which is called Nok Yak Jeong that named Myungwon's tea room. Chodang is used as a space for traditional tea culture and relaxation. For reference, Sarangchae and Byeolchae are also used for various seminars and studies, which is good for groups meeting in schools. If you want to rent a place, you must fill out an application form in advance and book it before you can borrow it on time.

 
 Programs at the Myungwon Folk Museum can be divided into three main categories. First, “Darye” provides regular liberal arts class at Kookmin University, teaching about tea (korean, englsih lecture are present). Second, there is an irregular music program, and third, a Korean cultural experience can be processed by request. Prof. Yoo Yang-suk teaches “Darye” and “Korean Tea Ceremony and World Tea Culture,” which are the basic lessons of life in many countries, for practical use. Through the tea culture experience and tea practice, we aim to acquire living manners, compare the characteristics of various kinds of tea, understand the characteristicsof world tea culture and make them available in real life, while also understanding our tea culture and the sentiment of tea to find the leisure of life, beauty, and wisdom of life.In addition to the class, the “<Pungryu Division> Master Series” organized by KMU host masters from various fields such as Ajeng, Gayageum, Daegeum, Pansori, folk songs, and Firi, all of who show off their their specialties. Additionally, regular spring and fall music programs — such as jazz and fusion music — are held every year. 
 

 Lastly, in the case of Korean cultural experiences, the hanok, hanbok (traditional Korean dress), jesa (ritual law), and darye (tea ceremony experience) will be divided into four different types. Availability is flexible when at least five students apply as a group. Since the program is hosted by a real expert, real expenses are incurred and costs can be adjusted to some extent depending on students’ financial circumstances. All of these programs have the same hours of operations as KMU facilities, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays, and are closed on weekends and holidays. Even if you don't have an extra reservation, you can freely visit the area during operating hours, so if you have time between classes, feel free to taste the arts by the back door.

Chan-Yeong Kim Reporter
niet89@kookmin.ac.kr

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