KMU Focus

The School of Business Administration Conducts ‘TBAKV’ Program in Vietnam

  • 15.05.14 / 박차현

The ‘Teaching Business Administration in Korean Language in Vietnam (TBAKV)’ is a unique program of the School of Business Administration in Kookmin University. Since its operation started 10 years ago, the students of the School of Business Administration have been dispatched to Vietnam during winter vacation. By using Korean language, they taught principles of business administration to the Vietnamese students through the ‘TBAKV’ program. From December 23, 2014 until January 6 2015, 44 Kookmin University students managed lectures on business administration for 15 days in the Ho Chi Minh City University of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Languages and International Studies - VNU, Vietnam National University in Hanoi, and University of Da Nang. The selected students, together with their team, set the curriculum for 10 sessions of the lecture and directly produced appropriate teaching materials. The Korean students systematically handled their classes by checking attendance, conducting tests, and handing out assignments. They were also required to submit a TBAKV report in booklet or video format after coming back to Korea.

In addition, each team of the dispatched students was assigned to undertake a group project called ‘Doing Business in Vietnam,’ which was a report on business matters related to Vietnam. Based on the business plans, there were some cases that generated good results and participated in the ‘International Day’ event.

The School of Business Administration supported the students’ living expenses including accommodation and food allowance, but the airfare of about KWN 600,000 and additional personal expenses were shouldered by the students. The participation in the ‘TBAKV’ program was included in the Sungkok Global Explore activity and 2 units were credited as elective. Since the Kookmin University students had to teach the basics of business administration in Korean language to Vietnamese students, only those who have attended more than four semesters (above sophomore standing) and acquired more than 4 K-points in the previous semester were admitted to the TBAKV program. Once the program announcement was made, an application form, copy of bankbook, and copy of passport had to be submitted to the Student Administration Team.

To know about the detailed experience of students regarding the TBAKV’ program last year, we had an interview with Min-jeong Kim (Class of 2012 in the School of Management Information Systems) and Eun-hyeok Jo (Class of 2010 in the School of Business Administration). (In this interview, they were called Kim and Jo).

 

Q. What was your reason for participating in the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Q. What was your reason for participating in the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Kim: I have heard about ‘TBAKV’ program even in my freshman year as it was a popular program of the School of Business Administration. But, only those who have completed more than four semesters in the School of Business Administration were allowed to apply for the program. So I applied for the program in my junior year. There was no interview required for the ‘TBAKV’ program, but self-introduction and credits were the main requirements. My previous trip to Europe before applying for the program also helped me decide to join the it because I wanted to go to another foreign country to have a new turning point in my life. I reflected about this for my self-introduction.

Jo: I was president of the Student Council of the School of Business Administration. My role was to encourage the students to participate in the undergraduate programs of the Department. So I thought of availing of the best program in Kookmin University. Frankly speaking, I am not comfortable traveling abroad as it is physically challenging. But TBAKV was a famous program offered by the School of Business Administration, and also, professors and seniors supported this program, so I decided to participate in it before graduating.

Kim: A total of four teams were organized and each team was composed of 10 students. Two weeks before leaving for Vietnam, I attended a lecture on Vietnamese culture and education in the School of Business Administration. The Vietnamese students who attended the graduate school of Kookmin University volunteered to lecture about greetings in Vietnamese, food culture, and certain behaviors that should not be done (taboos) in a socialist state like Vietnam. These classes were held twice a week for more than one hour. So each team member prepared the location and background of the university they would be teaching well. On weekdays, we taught business administration in the university but we also had to have cultural exploration during weekends. We researched various historical sites and entertaining activities near Hanoi.

Jo: There were many male students and seniors in my team. So we tried harder than other teams. I once taught business administration to Mongol exchange students in Kookmin University and I realized that there were many things to prepare. It is easy for Koreans to understand Chinese characters derived from Korean words but such are difficult for foreign students. That’s why I tried to easily explain things in Korean. During weekends, our team members got together and thought about how to easily explain educational materials to the Vietnamese students. Everybody cooperated well.

Q. Talk about your lecture with the Vietnamese students.



Kim: The first meeting with the Vietnamese students was the most memorable. There were many freshmen in the university’s Department of Korean Language who attended the classes. But there were also many students who spoke Korean really well. Although the principles of business administration were difficult, the students tried hard to learn and asked many questions. In Vietnam, school starts from 8 in the morning so we conducted the classes starting from 9 am. Although it was early for us, that time was not early for Vietnamese students. There were some students who asked us to conduct the classes earlier. So most lectures were held in the morning and after lunch, they had private lessons or they went to work.
 

Jo: Our class had many senior students in Korean Language. Also, there were students with different majors who attended lectures in business administration. I was surprised that there were many female students who majored in Korean language. Similar to Korea, it is said that there are many male students in the college of science and many female humanities students in Vietnam. I observed that Vietnamese way of thinking was similar to Koreans, so I felt at ease with the Vietnamese students. But I was surprised at their passion and sincerity. Thanks to the students who filled the lecture room, I was able to teach business administration passionately.

Jo: In the University of Da Nang, we had tea time after the lectures and we also played volleyball with the students in the field. The university only has a small area so the open field was also small, similar to the ones in Korean high schools. Vietnamese students often exercise or play games with friends. So we joined them because we wanted to share university life and memories with them, aside from the lectures on business administration.

Kim: After the lecture, we often had lunch together and went downtown. Since we did not know anything about the local cuisine, we often ate in hotels or common restaurants. But Vietnamese students suggested local delicacies so we enjoyed having them together. In Vietnam, motorcycle is commonly used as public transportation. As we rode a bicycle or bus, the Vietnamese students rode a motorcycle to come to the university. There were exclusive parking lots reserved for them. The Vietnamese students gave us rides to go downtown near the university.

Jo: We went to the sea near the University of Da Nang. Compared to Korean universities, there are many natural attractions and scenic backdrops in Vietnamese universities. I am from Busan and since I came to Seoul to study in the university, I was not able to come home often to Busan. Thanks to the ‘TBAKV’ program, I was able to go to the sea for a long time and it felt wonderful.

Kim and Jo: What we all felt from the Vietnamese students was their love for Korea. They have very positive impressions about Korean language and Korean culture. They want to resemble many parts of Korea. So we received warm hospitality from them. We really appreciate it.

Q. Is there any other experience that you shared with the Vietnamese students aside from the lectures?

Kim: I spent some time chatting with the Vietnamese students and we enjoyed tasting Vietnamese pudding and desserts on the streets. When I previously thought of Vietnamese food, only rice noodle soup came across my mind but actually, there were many kinds of delicacies in Vietnam. I was able to see and taste chicken and fish dishes flavored with unique Vietnamese spices, and also French bread and sausages.

Jo: We went to the nearby restaurants for lunch and dinner together with the Vietnamese students. Wherever we go, we got closer by sharing meals and stories together while eating. It was difficult for me to order in the restaurants when I went there with Korean students, but it was great experience when we dined out with Vietnamese students as they recommended delicious foods.

Jo: Our team got really close so we spent the New Year together. We were also invited to the singing contest held in the University of Da Nang. We enjoyed listening to songs together. I expected to listen to Vietnamese songs but there were also many K-pop and other pop songs. I realized once again that Korea has a good image in Vietnam.

Jo: One of the students in the Department of Korean Language invited us to her house as she wanted to show us the common or daily home-cooked meals in Vietnam. We really appreciated the invitation. All team members visited her house and had dinner. The home-cooked meals tasted differently from the dishes that we had in Vietnamese restaurants.

Q. How did you spend your weekends in Vietnam?

Kim: We went to SAPA during the weekend. I expected a lot since it was the place for Vietnamese minority. I really had fun and saw many other tourists from all over the world. We boarded a ship and went to a cave. The cultural heritage we saw included wooden buildings with beautiful decorations. There were also colorful flowers in the attractions. The ambient lighting uplifted the mood in these scenic spots.

Jo: We also went to many historical sites of Vietnam during the weekends. With the Vietnamese students, we went to the Rieng Temple in Da Nang. I was impressed by the high stairs and roof stretching towards the sky. We went to the historical site, My Son. The massive and layered rocks were the highlights of the natural landscape of Vietnam. Although it was a bit far form Da Nang, we got on a boat to see the famous attraction Nha Trang during the weekend.

Kim: I was not sad on our last day in Vietnam. Our students tried hard for 15 days and we passionately taught them. I was able to leave Vietnam with a happy feeling. Aside from the lectures, I left behind good memories in Vietnam so I felt great. I can still keep in touch with the Vietnamese students anytime. My friend said that he really liked Vietnam because of the ‘TBAKV’ program so he would find ways to work in Vietnam in the future.

Jo: I really appreciate the students who came to the airport to bid us goodbye when we left for Korea. As much as we tried hard to teach them, the students also exerted efforts in learning. Although 15 days were short for our meeting, I thanked our friends from the University of Da Nang who welcomed us with open minds. I can still remember a student who wrote a letter on a Vietnamese hat. The team members cherish the bracelet that we all bought together with the Vietnamese students. We exchanged personal contact information and we often keep in touch.

Q. Was there any change that happened to you after participating in the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Kim: I learned innocence and sincerity from the Vietnamese students. I was impressed by how they woke up early and studied, worked hard, and treated people with open mind. It made me reflect on myself. The look of the people working hard in Hanoi was different from the people I met while traveling in Europe. The experience I had in Vietnam became a good turning point for me.

Jo: Before participating in the program, I often thought of taking a rest during vacations. I didn’t like traveling around for experience. For me, it was meaningless to travel in Korea as well. But after the TBAKV, I felt a desperate need for overseas experience. Only one overseas experience changed my way of thinking for my future. I looked back at myself from where I stood and was then able to reorganize myself.
 

Q. Which students do you want to recommend the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Kim: I recommend it to the Kookmin*People in the School of Business Administration who need a change in perspective and for those who want to travel abroad like me.

Jo: I highly recommend it to students who are hesitant to travel like me, so they could change their way of thinking about going abroad. Also, it is a good program for students who are still searching for what they can do best. Once we gain experience, we achieve great rewards.

The two Kookmin*People from the School of Business Administration who participated in the ‘Teaching Business Administration in Korean Language in Vietnam (TBAKV)’. We appreciate their efforts to provide the growth foundation for Business Administration of Kookmin University in Korea and Vietnam. Through the interview, it was possible to listen to the stories of charming people and culture as well as the students’ impressions. We expect a bright future ahead for the School of Business Administration that will grow and develop through the program.

 

- Web journalist, PR Team

Kookmin Review Mi-su Kim 이메일

The School of Business Administration Conducts ‘TBAKV’ Program in Vietnam

The ‘Teaching Business Administration in Korean Language in Vietnam (TBAKV)’ is a unique program of the School of Business Administration in Kookmin University. Since its operation started 10 years ago, the students of the School of Business Administration have been dispatched to Vietnam during winter vacation. By using Korean language, they taught principles of business administration to the Vietnamese students through the ‘TBAKV’ program. From December 23, 2014 until January 6 2015, 44 Kookmin University students managed lectures on business administration for 15 days in the Ho Chi Minh City University of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Languages and International Studies - VNU, Vietnam National University in Hanoi, and University of Da Nang. The selected students, together with their team, set the curriculum for 10 sessions of the lecture and directly produced appropriate teaching materials. The Korean students systematically handled their classes by checking attendance, conducting tests, and handing out assignments. They were also required to submit a TBAKV report in booklet or video format after coming back to Korea.

In addition, each team of the dispatched students was assigned to undertake a group project called ‘Doing Business in Vietnam,’ which was a report on business matters related to Vietnam. Based on the business plans, there were some cases that generated good results and participated in the ‘International Day’ event.

The School of Business Administration supported the students’ living expenses including accommodation and food allowance, but the airfare of about KWN 600,000 and additional personal expenses were shouldered by the students. The participation in the ‘TBAKV’ program was included in the Sungkok Global Explore activity and 2 units were credited as elective. Since the Kookmin University students had to teach the basics of business administration in Korean language to Vietnamese students, only those who have attended more than four semesters (above sophomore standing) and acquired more than 4 K-points in the previous semester were admitted to the TBAKV program. Once the program announcement was made, an application form, copy of bankbook, and copy of passport had to be submitted to the Student Administration Team.

To know about the detailed experience of students regarding the TBAKV’ program last year, we had an interview with Min-jeong Kim (Class of 2012 in the School of Management Information Systems) and Eun-hyeok Jo (Class of 2010 in the School of Business Administration). (In this interview, they were called Kim and Jo).

 

Q. What was your reason for participating in the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Q. What was your reason for participating in the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Kim: I have heard about ‘TBAKV’ program even in my freshman year as it was a popular program of the School of Business Administration. But, only those who have completed more than four semesters in the School of Business Administration were allowed to apply for the program. So I applied for the program in my junior year. There was no interview required for the ‘TBAKV’ program, but self-introduction and credits were the main requirements. My previous trip to Europe before applying for the program also helped me decide to join the it because I wanted to go to another foreign country to have a new turning point in my life. I reflected about this for my self-introduction.

Jo: I was president of the Student Council of the School of Business Administration. My role was to encourage the students to participate in the undergraduate programs of the Department. So I thought of availing of the best program in Kookmin University. Frankly speaking, I am not comfortable traveling abroad as it is physically challenging. But TBAKV was a famous program offered by the School of Business Administration, and also, professors and seniors supported this program, so I decided to participate in it before graduating.

Kim: A total of four teams were organized and each team was composed of 10 students. Two weeks before leaving for Vietnam, I attended a lecture on Vietnamese culture and education in the School of Business Administration. The Vietnamese students who attended the graduate school of Kookmin University volunteered to lecture about greetings in Vietnamese, food culture, and certain behaviors that should not be done (taboos) in a socialist state like Vietnam. These classes were held twice a week for more than one hour. So each team member prepared the location and background of the university they would be teaching well. On weekdays, we taught business administration in the university but we also had to have cultural exploration during weekends. We researched various historical sites and entertaining activities near Hanoi.

Jo: There were many male students and seniors in my team. So we tried harder than other teams. I once taught business administration to Mongol exchange students in Kookmin University and I realized that there were many things to prepare. It is easy for Koreans to understand Chinese characters derived from Korean words but such are difficult for foreign students. That’s why I tried to easily explain things in Korean. During weekends, our team members got together and thought about how to easily explain educational materials to the Vietnamese students. Everybody cooperated well.

Q. Talk about your lecture with the Vietnamese students.



Kim: The first meeting with the Vietnamese students was the most memorable. There were many freshmen in the university’s Department of Korean Language who attended the classes. But there were also many students who spoke Korean really well. Although the principles of business administration were difficult, the students tried hard to learn and asked many questions. In Vietnam, school starts from 8 in the morning so we conducted the classes starting from 9 am. Although it was early for us, that time was not early for Vietnamese students. There were some students who asked us to conduct the classes earlier. So most lectures were held in the morning and after lunch, they had private lessons or they went to work.
 

Jo: Our class had many senior students in Korean Language. Also, there were students with different majors who attended lectures in business administration. I was surprised that there were many female students who majored in Korean language. Similar to Korea, it is said that there are many male students in the college of science and many female humanities students in Vietnam. I observed that Vietnamese way of thinking was similar to Koreans, so I felt at ease with the Vietnamese students. But I was surprised at their passion and sincerity. Thanks to the students who filled the lecture room, I was able to teach business administration passionately.

Jo: In the University of Da Nang, we had tea time after the lectures and we also played volleyball with the students in the field. The university only has a small area so the open field was also small, similar to the ones in Korean high schools. Vietnamese students often exercise or play games with friends. So we joined them because we wanted to share university life and memories with them, aside from the lectures on business administration.

Kim: After the lecture, we often had lunch together and went downtown. Since we did not know anything about the local cuisine, we often ate in hotels or common restaurants. But Vietnamese students suggested local delicacies so we enjoyed having them together. In Vietnam, motorcycle is commonly used as public transportation. As we rode a bicycle or bus, the Vietnamese students rode a motorcycle to come to the university. There were exclusive parking lots reserved for them. The Vietnamese students gave us rides to go downtown near the university.

Jo: We went to the sea near the University of Da Nang. Compared to Korean universities, there are many natural attractions and scenic backdrops in Vietnamese universities. I am from Busan and since I came to Seoul to study in the university, I was not able to come home often to Busan. Thanks to the ‘TBAKV’ program, I was able to go to the sea for a long time and it felt wonderful.

Kim and Jo: What we all felt from the Vietnamese students was their love for Korea. They have very positive impressions about Korean language and Korean culture. They want to resemble many parts of Korea. So we received warm hospitality from them. We really appreciate it.

Q. Is there any other experience that you shared with the Vietnamese students aside from the lectures?

Kim: I spent some time chatting with the Vietnamese students and we enjoyed tasting Vietnamese pudding and desserts on the streets. When I previously thought of Vietnamese food, only rice noodle soup came across my mind but actually, there were many kinds of delicacies in Vietnam. I was able to see and taste chicken and fish dishes flavored with unique Vietnamese spices, and also French bread and sausages.

Jo: We went to the nearby restaurants for lunch and dinner together with the Vietnamese students. Wherever we go, we got closer by sharing meals and stories together while eating. It was difficult for me to order in the restaurants when I went there with Korean students, but it was great experience when we dined out with Vietnamese students as they recommended delicious foods.

Jo: Our team got really close so we spent the New Year together. We were also invited to the singing contest held in the University of Da Nang. We enjoyed listening to songs together. I expected to listen to Vietnamese songs but there were also many K-pop and other pop songs. I realized once again that Korea has a good image in Vietnam.

Jo: One of the students in the Department of Korean Language invited us to her house as she wanted to show us the common or daily home-cooked meals in Vietnam. We really appreciated the invitation. All team members visited her house and had dinner. The home-cooked meals tasted differently from the dishes that we had in Vietnamese restaurants.

Q. How did you spend your weekends in Vietnam?

Kim: We went to SAPA during the weekend. I expected a lot since it was the place for Vietnamese minority. I really had fun and saw many other tourists from all over the world. We boarded a ship and went to a cave. The cultural heritage we saw included wooden buildings with beautiful decorations. There were also colorful flowers in the attractions. The ambient lighting uplifted the mood in these scenic spots.

Jo: We also went to many historical sites of Vietnam during the weekends. With the Vietnamese students, we went to the Rieng Temple in Da Nang. I was impressed by the high stairs and roof stretching towards the sky. We went to the historical site, My Son. The massive and layered rocks were the highlights of the natural landscape of Vietnam. Although it was a bit far form Da Nang, we got on a boat to see the famous attraction Nha Trang during the weekend.

Kim: I was not sad on our last day in Vietnam. Our students tried hard for 15 days and we passionately taught them. I was able to leave Vietnam with a happy feeling. Aside from the lectures, I left behind good memories in Vietnam so I felt great. I can still keep in touch with the Vietnamese students anytime. My friend said that he really liked Vietnam because of the ‘TBAKV’ program so he would find ways to work in Vietnam in the future.

Jo: I really appreciate the students who came to the airport to bid us goodbye when we left for Korea. As much as we tried hard to teach them, the students also exerted efforts in learning. Although 15 days were short for our meeting, I thanked our friends from the University of Da Nang who welcomed us with open minds. I can still remember a student who wrote a letter on a Vietnamese hat. The team members cherish the bracelet that we all bought together with the Vietnamese students. We exchanged personal contact information and we often keep in touch.

Q. Was there any change that happened to you after participating in the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Kim: I learned innocence and sincerity from the Vietnamese students. I was impressed by how they woke up early and studied, worked hard, and treated people with open mind. It made me reflect on myself. The look of the people working hard in Hanoi was different from the people I met while traveling in Europe. The experience I had in Vietnam became a good turning point for me.

Jo: Before participating in the program, I often thought of taking a rest during vacations. I didn’t like traveling around for experience. For me, it was meaningless to travel in Korea as well. But after the TBAKV, I felt a desperate need for overseas experience. Only one overseas experience changed my way of thinking for my future. I looked back at myself from where I stood and was then able to reorganize myself.
 

Q. Which students do you want to recommend the ‘TBAKV’ program?

Kim: I recommend it to the Kookmin*People in the School of Business Administration who need a change in perspective and for those who want to travel abroad like me.

Jo: I highly recommend it to students who are hesitant to travel like me, so they could change their way of thinking about going abroad. Also, it is a good program for students who are still searching for what they can do best. Once we gain experience, we achieve great rewards.

The two Kookmin*People from the School of Business Administration who participated in the ‘Teaching Business Administration in Korean Language in Vietnam (TBAKV)’. We appreciate their efforts to provide the growth foundation for Business Administration of Kookmin University in Korea and Vietnam. Through the interview, it was possible to listen to the stories of charming people and culture as well as the students’ impressions. We expect a bright future ahead for the School of Business Administration that will grow and develop through the program.

 

- Web journalist, PR Team

Kookmin Review Mi-su Kim 이메일
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