Kookmin People

School of Advanced Materials Engineering,Hyun Kyung Cho (Class of 2010), Publishes 3 Papers in SCI

  • 14.04.01 / 김소영

Hyun Kyung Cho, a senior in the Department of Advanced Materials Engineering at Kookmin University's College of Engineering, published a paper titled “Novel method of powder-based processing of copper nanofoams for their potential use in energy applications.” This paper suggests a cheaper new process using low temperature powder-based processes for copper nanofoams and was admitted for publication in Materials Chemistry & Physics (SCI, IF 2.1) - the world's leading journal on material physics and chemistry. The paper is to be published on the online edition of the issue, with Cho as the lead author. If so, Cho would be the author of three papers in international journals - following her work as coauthor in two papers published in Materials Letters Vol. 96, p. 117, 2013 (SCI, IF 2.2) and Nano Letters, Vol. 13, p. 4249, 2013 (SCI, IF 13).

 

 

 

The paper published in SCI is receiving the spotlight in the field of energy. New materials with greater surface area are taking center stage in energy technologies relating to secondary batteries, battery cells, and photovoltaic cells. In particular, metal materials with high conductivity and reliance (metal foams) are the focus of attention. The paper discusses the development of copper nanofoams for secondary battery cells and suggests other applications with high commercial value. Existing technology uses high temperature to melt the metal material and relies on a selective etching process afterwards. But Cho's research suggests a method of applying high pressure to copper powders for a low temperature alternative to creating nanomaterials. The powder process also allows for manufacturing of thin film shapes without an extra process, which would further accelerate the commercial usage of copper materials in secondary cells and other technologies related to electric cars.


Cho has been a member of the Center for Advanced Materials Technology (advanced material processes and individual laboratory, advisor: Hee Man Choi) since her sophomore year, and has been carrying on research in manufacturing and assessment of new metal material processes, which also includes her work in researching ceramic electrolyte materials for secondary cells. (International research support: Central Laboratory, headed by Professor Hoon Kwon)


Furthermore, Cho was able to publish these three papers while completing her coursework and graduating early for her major after just 7 semesters. We believe she represents the competitiveness and hard work of Kookmin students in the global stage.
Cho will be applying to the graduate school program at Kookmin for new material sciences, where she will be continuing her in-depth research in various metal materials. She hopes to apply various processes to other metal materials apart from copper to find the optimal material for commercial use.


Cho stated, "I look forward to the day our research is applied to real life electric cars, and hope I can continue my studies in graduate school alongside great fellow researchers and professors, and yield even better results."

 

School of Advanced Materials Engineering,Hyun Kyung Cho (Class of 2010), Publishes 3 Papers in SCI

Hyun Kyung Cho, a senior in the Department of Advanced Materials Engineering at Kookmin University's College of Engineering, published a paper titled “Novel method of powder-based processing of copper nanofoams for their potential use in energy applications.” This paper suggests a cheaper new process using low temperature powder-based processes for copper nanofoams and was admitted for publication in Materials Chemistry & Physics (SCI, IF 2.1) - the world's leading journal on material physics and chemistry. The paper is to be published on the online edition of the issue, with Cho as the lead author. If so, Cho would be the author of three papers in international journals - following her work as coauthor in two papers published in Materials Letters Vol. 96, p. 117, 2013 (SCI, IF 2.2) and Nano Letters, Vol. 13, p. 4249, 2013 (SCI, IF 13).

 

 

 

The paper published in SCI is receiving the spotlight in the field of energy. New materials with greater surface area are taking center stage in energy technologies relating to secondary batteries, battery cells, and photovoltaic cells. In particular, metal materials with high conductivity and reliance (metal foams) are the focus of attention. The paper discusses the development of copper nanofoams for secondary battery cells and suggests other applications with high commercial value. Existing technology uses high temperature to melt the metal material and relies on a selective etching process afterwards. But Cho's research suggests a method of applying high pressure to copper powders for a low temperature alternative to creating nanomaterials. The powder process also allows for manufacturing of thin film shapes without an extra process, which would further accelerate the commercial usage of copper materials in secondary cells and other technologies related to electric cars.


Cho has been a member of the Center for Advanced Materials Technology (advanced material processes and individual laboratory, advisor: Hee Man Choi) since her sophomore year, and has been carrying on research in manufacturing and assessment of new metal material processes, which also includes her work in researching ceramic electrolyte materials for secondary cells. (International research support: Central Laboratory, headed by Professor Hoon Kwon)


Furthermore, Cho was able to publish these three papers while completing her coursework and graduating early for her major after just 7 semesters. We believe she represents the competitiveness and hard work of Kookmin students in the global stage.
Cho will be applying to the graduate school program at Kookmin for new material sciences, where she will be continuing her in-depth research in various metal materials. She hopes to apply various processes to other metal materials apart from copper to find the optimal material for commercial use.


Cho stated, "I look forward to the day our research is applied to real life electric cars, and hope I can continue my studies in graduate school alongside great fellow researchers and professors, and yield even better results."

 

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